Myelofibrosis

Sue’s Story


Sue’s myelofibrosis story

A devoted wife and mother, Sue was surprised when a diagnosis of intermediate-risk myelofibrosis (MF) made her miss out on plans to see her oldest son play college baseball. Watch Sue's story and learn about her journey with intermediate-risk MF.

Video Transcript

Sue: I'm Sue. I'm a mother of 3 boys. I've been married for 26 years, and I run a home daycare.

Onscreen text: SUE'S PATH TO POSSIBLE WITH JAKAFI® (ruxolitinib)

Sue: I was living a normal life as anybody else does. I was busy following my boys around, working, going out with friends, being social and active.

Sue’s son, Colin: Growing up, my mom has always been a superstar. She's always been the one chasing after us 3 boys, whether it's baseball or football or wrestling or you know, taking us back and forth to school.

Sue: I was always active…and then, I got tired. I started wanting to take the elevator instead of the stairs. I started not being able to eat. And I started having side pains.

Sue’s husband, Gary: She wasn’t eating as much, and she was going to bed before I went to bed, which was totally out of character for her.

Sue: I was supposed to leave for a vacation, and I was afraid to fly with the symptoms I was feeling.

Sue’s son, Corey: They were supposed to come visit me on my spring trip down in Florida for baseball. I got the phone call from the dad that they weren't making it.

Sue: So, I went to the doctor and within a week, was diagnosed with myelofibrosis.

Narrator: Myelofibrosis is a rare disease of the bone marrow. The bone marrow is the material inside the bone where blood cells are made.

Sue: All I could think was what I'm going to be missing. I was afraid I’m not going to get to see my kids graduate from college or get married or have kids of their own. Yeah, I was just really afraid about what I was going to miss. My symptoms were exhaustion, fatigue, side pain, loss of appetite, and itchiness.

Onscreen text: Common symptoms of MF include tiredness, pain or fullness on the left side under the ribs, night sweats, bone or joint pain, and weight loss.

Sue: My hematologist approached me with this new drug called Jakafi that was the first of its kind to manage the symptoms of myelofibrosis. I was excited to start it and when I finally received it in the mail I did notice an improvement in my symptoms and my quality of life.

Onscreen text: Your Healthcare Professional will work with you to make a plan that is right for you. Jakafi (ruxolitinib) may be a treatment option.

Gary: We wanted something that would help her with her quality of life to relieve her symptoms so that she could function day to day.

Sue: It was shortly after starting Jakafi that I got my energy back. I was amazed. My husband and I went out to dinner and there was a band playing and I didn't need to go home after dinner. I wanted to stay and listen and dance, and it didn't hit me until I started dancing that I was like, oh my gosh. I have my energy back. Like I feel good.

Onscreen text: Individual results with Jakafi may vary. Only your Healthcare Professional can decide if Jakafi is right for you.

Connor: When she started taking the medicine, she definitely seemed like she was getting more upbeat and more involved in everything that was going on.

Sue: My spleen pain went away, and I got my appetite back. I started being able to eat a full meal again.

Onscreen text: IncyteCARES is a patient support program for people taking Jakafi. (Jakafi® ruxolitinib logo)

Narrator: During her treatment with Jakafi, Sue's co-pay changed drastically, so she contacted IncyteCARES.

Sue: IncyteCARES sent me information packages that helped me track my symptoms so that when you went to the doctor you could remember what happened between visits. So the information that they sent was very beneficial in helping me keep track and follow what was happening. So I contacted them and got co-pay assistance to a very manageable level.

Narrator: IncyteCARES offers people taking Jakafi reimbursement support, delivery coordination, financial assistance options, temporary access for coverage delays, connection to support services, and ongoing education and support.

Onscreen text: Learn more at www.IncyteCARES.com. (Jakafi® ruxolitinib logo)

Sue has been taking Jakafi since 2012.

Sue: Jakafi has given me the energy and the strength to do what I want to do. I’m happy. I live well. 6 years later I’m living my life the way I want to.

Gary: Oh the future’s bright. We’re traveling. Sue’s creating adventures for us that we would have never taken.

Sue: So 6 years later I feel pretty good. I’ve added a lot of positives to my life. I appreciate every day a little more. I’m living very happy and cherish what I have.

Onscreen text: The path your MF journey may take depends on your individual circumstances—as well as the decisions you make with your Healthcare Professional. (Jakafi® ruxolitinib logo)

Onscreen text and narrator: Important Safety Information

Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: low platelet count, low red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider. Do not drink grapefruit juice while on Jakafi.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if breast-feeding.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1-855-463-3463.

Onscreen text: Register now for information, support, and resources about Jakafi. Visit www.Jakafi.com/Register.aspx.

The video is sponsored by Incyte Corporation. Jakafi and the Jakafi logo are registered trademarks of Incyte. © 2018, Incyte Corporation. All rights reserved. MAT-JAK-00026  08/18

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Important Safety Information

Indications and Usage

Jakafi is a prescription medicine used to treat people with polycythemia vera who have already taken a medicine called hydroxyurea and it did not work well enough or they could not tolerate it.

Jakafi is also used to treat certain types of myelofibrosis.

Important Safety Information

Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: low platelet count, low red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider. Do not drink grapefruit juice while on Jakafi.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if breast-feeding.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1-855-463-3463.