Myelofibrosis

Nick’s Story


Watch Nick tell his myelofibrosis story

Nick was diagnosed with high-risk myelofibrosis (MF) after a routine medical check. Hear Nick discuss his experience with MF symptoms, as well as some of the challenges he faces living with MF.

Video Transcript

Nick: Hi, my name’s Nicholas….When I’m not doing my professional job, I do expedition kayaking. Right now I’m kayaking a 600 kilometer paddle of the entire length of Lake Malawi, in Eastern Southern Africa. I’m talking to you from a beautiful beach that you can really only get to from kayak, in a part of Mozambique. I’m also a cancer patient…

Onscreen text: EXPLORING THE POSSIBILITIES: NICK’S JOURNEY

Nick: Around 2010…I did a routine health/medical check and my doctor at that time said, “Hmm, there are some strange signals in your white blood cell count….”

Nick: ...so I went to a specialist.

Nick: A few days later I got the diagnosis of myelofibrosis.

Onscreen text: Nick was diagnosed with high-risk myelofibrosis (MF) in 2010.

Onscreen text and narrator: Myelofibrosis is a rare, chronic blood cancer and is part of a group of diseases called myeloproliferative neoplasms or MPNs.

Nick: It’s not like it’s been an easy ride. Not at all.

Onscreen text: Symptoms related to an enlarged spleen include:

  • Pain on the left side under the ribs
  • Early feeling of fullness
  • Abdominal discomfort

Nick: Myelofibrosis manifests itself differently in people. With me, it’s an enlarged spleen, and…extreme itching. It’ll drive you mad. It’s miserable. The itching is miserable.

Onscreen text: Symptoms not related to an enlarged spleen include:

  • Tiredness
  • Night sweats
  • Itching
  • Bone or muscle pain

Nick: It’s like pine needles on the inside of your body, scraping everywhere around your body.

Nick: Jakafi was first revealed to me back in 2011.

Onscreen text and narrator: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) is the first FDA-approved prescription medicine used to treat adults with intermediate or high-risk myelofibrosis.

Onscreen text: This is Nick’s experience with Jakafi. Individual results may vary. Only your Healthcare Professional can decide if Jakafi is right for you.

Nick: So I was very fortunate to get this diagnosis just when Jakafi was coming through the proof-of-concept stage and actual trials were successful…

Nick: …so I benefitted from that.

Onscreen text and narrator: Jakafi can cause serious side effects including low blood counts and infection. Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Increases in blood cholesterol levels can also occur. The most common side effects of Jakafi for certain types of MF and PV include: low platelet or red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache, and diarrhea. Tell your doctor about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. To learn more about these and other risks, please read the Important Safety Information at the end of this video.

Nick: Jakafi…which I started taking regularly since 2011…has an effect of tampering down that itching for me…it keeps my spleen from getting overly large.

Onscreen text: Nick’s MF journey wasn’t always easy.

Nick: Over the past couple of years I’ve had a couple of insurance glitches, and I haven’t been able to access Jakafi.

Onscreen text: IncyteCARES is a patient support program for people taking Jakafi.

Narrator: To help Nick restore his access to Jakafi, he contacted IncyteCARES.

Nick: I was actually in IncyteCARES program. I benefitted in terms of cost reduction and accessibility to the medications, and I think that type of program is hugely important. With Jakafi, I have a trusted approach to addressing my cancer.

Onscreen text: This is Nick’s experience with Jakafi. Individual results may vary. Only your Healthcare Professional can decide if Jakafi is right for you.

Nick: I’m able to work…I’m able to pursue my own personal passions…not be living my day in, day out, thinking about my diagnosis. And it’s not just about health. It’s about family members. It’s about being a productive member in society and living to your fullest. I like to reach new challenges…and perhaps my biggest challenge is going to be myelofibrosis.

Onscreen text and narrator: Important Safety Information

Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: for certain types of MF and PV – low platelet or red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache, and diarrhea; and for acute GVHD – low platelet, red or white blood cell counts, infections, and fluid retention.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, have high cholesterol or triglycerides, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Do not breastfeed during treatment with Jakafi and for 2 weeks after the final dose.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1-855-463-3463.

Onscreen text: Register now for information, support, and resources. Visit Jakafi.com/Register.

The video is sponsored by Incyte Corporation. Jakafi and the Jakafi logo are registered trademarks of Incyte.
© 2020, Incyte Corporation. MAT-JAK-00605  04/20

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INDICATIONS AND USAGE

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Jakafi is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with polycythemia vera who have already taken a medicine called hydroxyurea and it did not work well enough or they could not tolerate it.

Jakafi is used to treat adults with certain types of myelofibrosis.

Jakafi is also used to treat adults and children 12 years of age and older with acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) who have taken corticosteroids and they did not work well enough.

Important Safety Information

Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: for certain types of MF and PV – low platelet or red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache, and diarrhea; and for acute GVHD – low platelet, red or white blood cell counts, infections, and fluid retention.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, have high cholesterol or triglycerides, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Do not breastfeed during treatment with Jakafi and for 2 weeks after the final dose.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1-855-463-3463.