Polycythemia Vera

Rob’s Story


Hear Rob’s Story

See how Rob, an avid gardener and keen outdoorsman, adjusted to life with polycythemia vera (PV) and how taking Jakafi helped move his PV journey forward.

Video Transcript

Rob: My name is Rob. I'm a pediatrician. I live in Arkansas with my wife…

Onscreen text: ROB'S PATH TO POSSIBLE WITH JAKAFI® (ruxolitinib)

Rob: I love to be outside. When I work in the yard, it's solitude. I love nature.

Rob: And so I was, I was moving along, pretty active.

Rob: I've been a blood donor for years, and whenever I would donate blood, they would say, "You have such a high hemoglobin that you can donate two units." And it never occurred to me that that might be abnormal.

Rob: In the year or two before I was diagnosed, I began to have a lot of fullness in my abdomen, and I had lost some weight.

Rob: So I saw my primary care doctor…and he was obviously quite concerned.

Rob: …he did a variety of tests…he also noticed that my spleen was very enlarged.

Rob: …when he called me for the blood tests, he said…"Your hematocrit is about 55 to 56. And, normal should be about 44, 45…and I'm referring you to a hematologist."

Rob: …so I had a CT scan which revealed that I had an enormously enlarged spleen…about 10 times my normal size.

Rob: So I had more blood tests. I underwent a bone marrow evaluation. And after all of those came back, we had another visit with the hematologist….

Onscreen text: Rob was diagnosed with polycythemia vera (PV) in 2017.

Rob: …and he kind of laid out, "You have polycythemia vera."

Onscreen text and narrator: Polycythemia vera, or PV, is a rare, chronic blood cancer that is part of a group of diseases called myeloproliferative neoplasms, or MPNs. In PV, a person’s body makes too many red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

Rob: The diagnosis was a bit of a shock.

Onscreen text: VICKI, ROB'S WIFE

Vicki: Neither one of us had ever dealt with anything like that before so it was really frightening….

Rob: It was a humbling experience, because I'm used to being in the provider role and I had to become a patient….

Rob: I knew my life was going to change.

Rob: It's not a cookie cutter illness. It's, it's something that affects different people differently.

Rob: It's chronic. It’s not something that you take a course of medicine and then you're…done.

Onscreen text: This is Rob's experience with Jakafi. Individual results will vary.

Rob: The interesting thing about having PV is that you don't look sick. And when you tell people, they are surprised because they say, "You aren't gaunt, and you aren't weak looking. And you've got good color."

Onscreen text: Hydroxyurea, or HU, is a type of chemotherapy drug that may be used to help reduce the number of blood cells in some people with PV.

Rob: I was started initially on hydroxyurea…my counts would bounce all around.

Onscreen text and narrator: If your Healthcare Professional is having trouble reducing your spleen size and/or keeping your hematocrit in your target range using HU, it may be a sign of resistance to HU.

Rob: …after three to four months…my spleen size had not been affected at all.

Rob: …and so, my hematologist…said, "…I think it's time that we maybe see an MPN specialist…."

Rob: And so I did…and he said that there's a medication now that I think that it's time to start called Jakafi.

Onscreen text and narrator: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) is the first and only FDA-approved prescription medicine for adults with PV who have already taken a medicine called hydroxyurea (HU) and it did not work well enough or they could not tolerate it.

Rob: And so I started taking that in May of 2017 and have been on it since then, and it has been a very helpful medicine for me.

Vicki: …we were thrilled that there might be something that could control not only the blood counts, but also reduce his spleen…

Onscreen text: This is Rob's experience with Jakafi. Individual results may vary. Only your Healthcare Professional can decide if Jakafi may be right for you.

Rob: After I'd been on the medication for a while…my spleen was getting smaller, I had a better appetite, I gained weight back…

Rob: I didn't have the abdominal fullness and discomfort. And I was able to work in the yard and do everything that I want to do, maintain an active lifestyle, wrestle with my grandchildren…

Rob: …My white count, my platelet count, my red cell count, hematocrit, have been just very, very well regulated.

Rob: I see my doctor every three months…

Rob: It is very important to track your counts…because I like to just know that I'm on top of it.

Rob: …taking a pill twice a day is a pretty small price to pay for feeling good…

Onscreen text: While Rob is a practicing physician, this is his personal experience as a patient with PV. Your individual results may vary. Talk to your Healthcare Professional to see if Jakafi may be right for you.

Rob: While I am a practicing physician, this is my own personal experience as a patient with PV.

Rob: Since I've been diagnosed with PV and have been taking Jakafi, I, I realized that there are no guarantees, that things can change. But I think it's just very important to maintain a positive outlook.

Rob: I feel grateful that there is a medicine that is so specifically helpful…

Rob: The way I look at it is I have PV, but PV doesn't have me, that life is good.

Onscreen text and narrator: Important Safety Information

Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: for certain types of MF and PV – low platelet or red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache, and diarrhea; and for acute GVHD – low platelet, red or white blood cell counts, infections and fluid retention.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, have high cholesterol or triglycerides, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Do not breastfeed during treatment with Jakafi and for 2 weeks after the final dose.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1-855-463-3463.

Onscreen text: Register now for information, support, and resources. Visit Jakafi.com/Register

The video is sponsored by Incyte Corporation. Jakafi and the Jakafi logo are registered trademarks of Incyte.

© 2020, Incyte Corporation. MAT-JAK-00859  03/20

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INDICATIONS AND USAGE

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Jakafi is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with polycythemia vera who have already taken a medicine called hydroxyurea and it did not work well enough or they could not tolerate it.

Jakafi is used to treat adults with certain types of myelofibrosis.

Jakafi is also used to treat adults and children 12 years of age and older with acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) who have taken corticosteroids and they did not work well enough.

Important Safety Information

Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: for certain types of MF and PV – low platelet or red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache, and diarrhea; and for acute GVHD – low platelet, red or white blood cell counts, infections, and fluid retention.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, have high cholesterol or triglycerides, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Do not breastfeed during treatment with Jakafi and for 2 weeks after the final dose.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1-855-463-3463.