Polycythemia Vera

Jack’s Story


Hear Jack’s story

Learn how Jack’s polycythemia vera (PV) diagnosis and intolerance of hydroxyurea prompted him to talk to his Healthcare Professional about treatment possibilities with Jakafi. Jakafi is a prescription medicine for people with PV who have already taken a medicine called hydroxyurea and it did not work well enough or they could not tolerate it.

Video Transcript

Onscreen text: Jack researches treatment options for polycythemia vera after he could not tolerate hydroxyurea.

Jack S., Phoenix, Arizona

Jack: I’ve been a very, very healthy person throughout my working career. My wife and I retired. Came to Western Colorado on a small horse ranch, and after about 5 years we came down here to Phoenix. I am very active for 75 years old.

Onscreen text: Jack’s Wife, Pat
Phoenix, Arizona

Jack’s wife, Pat: Jack loves to fly. He’s flown for years, and in fact, is building his own airplane at the present time.

Jack: Suddenly I developed a bout of atrial fibrillation. In the process of dealing with that, a very wise, experienced cardiologist said, “Now we need to think about what might have caused that atrial fibrillation.” He said you had a hematocrit level of 62, and that’s extremely high. He said, “I suspect you’re going to find that you have a disease called polycythemia vera.”

Onscreen text: Polycythemia vera (PV) is a rare and chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm (a blood cancer) that does not go away and may get worse over time.

Jack: Early on I, of course, connected with a local oncologist and started learning a bit about the treatment that we were likely going to follow. For me, I ended up, I believe 8 years with phlebotomies, but I knew that eventually it was likely that I would need to move from phlebotomy to what I’d call level two, which was the hydroxyurea approach. I had tried hydroxyurea, probably 3 weeks. I made a yeoman’s effort to tolerate hydroxyurea, and simply couldn’t. My mouth and tongue were so sore; I couldn’t even drink water with it.

Onscreen text: Of the people with PV who are treated with hydroxyurea (HU), over time 1 in 4 either do not benefit from or cannot tolerate the treatment.

Jack: I got on the Internet at that time, and…found a study that was coming out of MD Anderson, sponsored by Incyte to have a trial study for Jakafi, for polycythemia vera.

Narrator: Jack participated in a clinical trial of Jakafi (ruxolitinib), the first and only prescription medicine approved by the FDA for treatment of people with polycythemia vera who had already taken a medicine called hydroxyurea and it did not work well enough or they could not tolerate it.

Jack: We began to see some progress fairly early on, and over a very reasonable period of time. The count started to move in the direction that allowed me not to have to have any more phlebotomies.

Onscreen text: Jakafi is not for everyone. Only your Healthcare Professional can decide if Jakafi is right for you. Your individual results may vary.

Jack: My life is, I think, quite average, and I’m very pleased with it. I don’t feel any restrictions other than those that I normally have with age.

Onscreen text: As a clinical trial participant, Jack receives Jakafi for free from Incyte Corporation.

Pat: We have a small trailer, and we love to camp in the Colorado Rockies. We just love to travel.

Jack: Don’t sit back and wait for everything to happen to you.

Pat: Don’t panic. Just be as supportive as you can. Do all you can do to help with anything they need.

Jack: Get engaged, do your research, make your contacts, feel that you know, not of course, what the experts and the specialists know, but enough that you’re comfortable with what they say to you and what the treatment protocol is going to be for you.

Onscreen text: If you have polycythemia vera and have already taken a medicine called hydroxyurea and it did not work well enough or you could not tolerate it, talk to your Healthcare Professional about Jakafi.

Jack: I would certainly encourage anyone who has not been tolerant of hydroxyurea to talk with their specialist and do their own research regarding Jakafi.

Onscreen text and narrator: Important Safety Information

Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: low platelet count, low red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider. Do not drink grapefruit juice while on Jakafi.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if breast-feeding.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Onscreen text: You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1-855-463-3463.

Onscreen text: Register now for information, support, and resources about polycythemia vera and Jakafi. Visit www.jakafi.com/register

Onscreen text: The video is sponsored by Incyte Corporation. Jakafi is a registered trademark of Incyte Corporation. © 2016, Incyte Corporation. All rights reserved. RUX-1572   05/16

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Important Safety Information

Indications and Usage

Jakafi is a prescription medicine used to treat people with polycythemia vera who have already taken a medicine called hydroxyurea and it did not work well enough or they could not tolerate it.

Jakafi is also used to treat certain types of myelofibrosis.

Important Safety Information

Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: low platelet count, low red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider. Do not drink grapefruit juice while on Jakafi.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if breast-feeding.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1-855-463-3463.