Myelofibrosis

Dan’s Story


Hear Dan’s story

Hear Dan talk about fatigue, itching, and other symptoms of his myelofibrosis (MF) before and after he started taking Jakafi®. Jakafi is a prescription medicine for people with intermediate or high-risk MF.

Video Transcript

Onscreen text: DAN DISCOVERS WHAT’S POSSIBLE WITH JAKAFI® (ruxolitinib)

Dan: My name is Dan. I’ve always been kind of a young person at whatever age I’m at. My health, generally, throughout my life has been very good, being a member of the country club, and that sort of thing, you know, I was very active. And then about 10 years ago, I started experiencing a couple of things that were a little bit abnormal.

Onscreen text: DAN, PATIENT WITH INTERMEDIATE-RISK MYELOFIBROSIS

Dan: I recognized that I was itching when I would get wet, you know out of the shower or the pool. I was having night sweats and things like that, but I just chalked that up to living in a high humidity location. So I didn’t think about that as being part of a disease process.

I had this large mass in my upper left quadrant and I’d had it for a good while. I just didn’t tell anybody about it till 1 day I was getting ready for a golf tournament and I felt it tug on my back swing. Well, the very next morning bright and early, I was in the doctor’s office.

He was you know checking me out, and he kind of stood up and turned a little white. Finally, he just took a breath, and he said, “Dan, we need to go see the Oncologist.” And that’s really not something you want to hear. Originally, they were diagnosing it as some form of leukemia, but then they diagnosed me as polycythemia vera. And that’s a myeloproliferative neoplasm.

Onscreen text and narrator: Polycythemia vera or PV is a rare, chronic blood cancer in which a person’s body makes too many red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. PV is part of a group of diseases called myeloproliferative neoplasms or MPNs.

Carolyn: I personally was scared—going through the process of finding out what was wrong, and his initial diagnosis. And we thought, well, life is different but we can manage this.

Onscreen text: MPNs are a group of rare, chronic blood cancers in which a person’s bone marrow does not function properly.

Dan: About a year and a half then into the polycythemia vera diagnosis, then things changed. They sent me through a battery of tests and then confirmed the diagnosis that it was myelofibrosis.

Onscreen text: Myelofibrosis (MF) is a rare, chronic blood cancer that affects the bone marrow and the production of blood cells. MF can occur on its own or as a progression of other bone marrow diseases, such as PV.

Dan: That was not a particularly good diagnosis to have. There was no treatment for myelofibrosis, nothing to make you feel comfortable, nothing to cure it, nothing to even treat the symptoms. My symptoms were very similar to the symptoms of PV, but the thing that was a little bit different was the fatigue. It wasn’t like running up a hill; it was more a motivational fatigue. You know, I’d be laying on the couch, and I knew I could get up, but I didn’t want to.

Narrator: Some people with MF live symptom-free for years. Others, however, may get progressively worse, requiring treatment. Dan participated in a clinical trial of Jakafi (ruxolitinib).

Onscreen text: In a clinical trial in patients with intermediate or high-risk MF, Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) was compared with treatment with a placebo (sugar pill). As a clinical trial participant, Dan received Jakafi at no cost from Incyte Corporation.

Dan: We were pretty pleased that there was a possibility. After taking Jakafi, I saw an improvement in the size of my spleen and my symptoms.

Onscreen text: Individual results with Jakafi may vary. Only your Healthcare Professional can decide if Jakafi is right for you.

Narrator and onscreen text: Clinical studies showed that Jakafi helped some patients reduce spleen size and improve the core symptoms of MF.

Dan: When my time on the trial was scheduled to be over, they asked me to stay on the trial for a bit longer. So, I think our total time on the trial was 5 years.

Onscreen text: Dan has been taking Jakafi since 2010.

Narrator: As a result of the clinical trial, Jakafi became the first and only prescription medication approved by the FDA to treat patients with intermediate or high-risk MF.

Dan: Jakafi is the only proven therapy for myelofibrosis. So I’ve reached a very stable point physically, which means I’m at a very stable place emotionally. I still have the disease, but I’m not suffering.

Onscreen text: Learn more about Jakafi clinical trials at Jakafi.com/About

Carolyn: We continue to have this beautiful daughter, and a son-in-law, and a grandson that Dan can enjoy.

Onscreen text: The path your MF journey may take depends on your individual circumstances—as well as the decisions you make with your Healthcare Professional.

Dan: I expect to have an enjoyable retirement, living my life with Carolyn, watching my grandson grow and being a part of their lives.

Onscreen text: Talk to your Healthcare Professional to discover if Jakafi may be right for you.

Onscreen text and narrator: Important Safety Information

Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: low platelet count, low red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider. Do not drink grapefruit juice while on Jakafi.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if breast-feeding.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1-855-463-3463.

Register now for information, support, and resources. Visit Jakafi.com/Register

The video is sponsored by Incyte Corporation. Jakafi is a registered trademark of Incyte.

© 2017, Incyte Corporation. All rights reserved. RUX-2290  12/17

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Important Safety Information

Indications and Usage

Jakafi is a prescription medicine used to treat people with polycythemia vera who have already taken a medicine called hydroxyurea and it did not work well enough or they could not tolerate it.

Jakafi is also used to treat certain types of myelofibrosis.

Important Safety Information

Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: low platelet count, low red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider. Do not drink grapefruit juice while on Jakafi.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if breast-feeding.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1-855-463-3463.