Myelofibrosis

Scott’s Myelofibrosis Story


Watch Scott’s story

After Scott was diagnosed, his Healthcare Professional immediately prescribed Jakafi®. Learn about his personal experience and see how IncyteCARES helped Scott afford his medication. Jakafi is a prescription medicine for people with intermediate or high-risk myelofibrosis.

Video Transcript

Narrator: A diagnosis of myelofibrosis scared Scott Dahlberg. He had never heard of the condition before and didn’t know what it was or how to treat it. His doctor reassured him right away by explaining the disease to him and telling him there was a medicine that could help. This is the story of Scott’s experience.

Scott: I’m Scott Dahlberg. I live in Durango, Colorado, retired here for 18 years now. I was an independent contractor as a salesman in the graphic arts industry. I’m the most lucky guy there is. I really enjoyed my occupation, I had a wonderful family and raised 3 kids. I met my beautiful wife in high school. We were both sophomores, and we met in Mrs. Jones’ biology class. In November, it’ll be 58 years that we’ve been married, and she’s as beautiful today as she was when I was dating her in high school. I developed a lump, and we thought it was a hernia. I had severe diarrhea and I lost 30 pounds of weight and I had pressure under my left rib cage.

Scott’s wife, Ruth: I knew something was up. He wasn't really telling me the whole truth about how he felt, so I truly wasn't worried. We've never had any major problems throughout our life, so I didn't worry until we got home and we started looking into why he had lost all the weight. We discovered that he was not healthy, that his spleen had become enlarged, and it was pressing on his stomach, and it caused his appetite to go down, and that's why he was losing the weight.

Scott: Within a week, I was at the cancer center at our local hospital at the oncology department, and they took some additional blood tests and diagnosed me with myelofibrosis. When I was diagnosed in my oncologist’s office, she said I’m going to put you on a medication and it’s called Jakafi.

Narrator: Jakafi® also known as ruxolitinib, is a prescription medicine used to treat people with intermediate or high-risk myelofibrosis, including primary myelofibrosis, post–polycythemia vera myelofibrosis, and post–essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis.

Ruth: When the oncologist diagnosed Scott with myelofibrosis, she decided then and there to put Scott on Jakafi. She didn't want to watch and wait.

Narrator: Scott’s oncologist’s office sent his paperwork to IncyteCARES—a program that connects patients to ongoing support and resources, such as co-pay assistance and educational brochures. A representative called him to let him know that IncyteCARES had checked his benefits through his Medicare plan, and what his coinsurance would be. Because the coinsurance amount was high, IncyteCARES offered to put Scott in contact with an organization that could assist him in getting financial assistance. The Chronic Disease Fund, the nation’s leading organization for copayment assistance, screened and approved Scott for financial assistance, and IncyteCARES sent his prescription to the specialty pharmacy.

Scott: What happened then was I got a phone call from the pharmacy and they told me that they were going to ship and they wanted to make sure I’d be home to receive the package. I started on it the next morning. My oncologist said that the Jakafi works different for different people, but normally if everything goes fine, I could go back to my old habits.

Onscreen text: Jakafi is not for everyone. Only your doctor can decide if Jakafi is right for you.

Scott: Jakafi is no problem to take. I just have my little cup by my dinner plate and I have my pill before dinner and the same thing in the morning at breakfast

Onscreen text: Do not drink grapefruit juice while taking Jakafi.

Narrator: Jakafi is a pill that is generally taken twice a day. It is important to take both doses of Jakafi as prescribed because the medicine in Jakafi must stay in your body for a certain amount of time to work effectively. In certain cases, your doctor may temporarily reduce your dose of Jakafi to once a day. Always follow your doctor’s directions.

Jakafi may help people with intermediate or high-risk myelofibrosis by reducing the size of their enlarged spleen and improving certain core symptoms, including abdominal discomfort, an early feeling of fullness, pain under the left ribs, itching, night sweats, and bone or muscle pain. Individual results may vary.

Scott: After 2 weeks, I went in for another blood test with my oncologist and she lowered it because my platelets came down too fast, and we are monitoring it now. I’ll go in another 2 weeks and she’ll monitor my blood again. I was told by my oncologist that some of the side effects from taking Jakafi could be low blood count, dizziness, nausea, and infection. I’ve got to be very careful– be aware that I can bruise myself.

Onscreen text: Important Safety Information

Onscreen text and narrator: Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: low platelet count, low red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider. Do not drink grapefruit juice while on Jakafi.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if breast‐feeding.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Onscreen text: You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1‐855‐463‐3463

Take Jakafi exactly as your doctor tells you. Your doctor may change the dose or stop treatment with Jakafi based on your response or if you have any side effects.

Scott: When I was first diagnosed that morning with myelofibrosis, I was scared and I really didn’t realize what it meant—what’s going to happen to the rest of my life. With the support of Incyte and the information that they sent me, I got educated. My oncologist didn’t hesitate to wait and see how my illness would progress; she immediately prescribed Jakafi. I was very relieved that she diagnosed me and could prescribe a medication. The people that work at Incyte, they knocked my socks off by the support that I’ve got …the phone calls I’ve been getting. They are there for my support, and also if I need financial support with my copay, they have a program set up for that. I got a packet of care information that told all about the product, all about my illness, and how also they have an oncologist that will support and answer any of my questions.

Narrator: If you do not have the Patient Packet of informational brochures and resources and would like to receive one, contact IncyteCARES at 1-855-4-JAKAFI, or online at www.IncyteCARES.com. Once you enroll and are found to be eligible for the IncyteCARES program, you will be able to take advantage of the resources offered by this support program.

Ruth: What's important to me also and probably also to Scott (is) just having…to be able to have this opportunity to let other people know that it has worked for him and that we just thoroughly love Jakafi. And the company has been so helpful and interesting to work with. We’re very pleased.

Narrator: For more information about Jakafi, visit www.Jakafi.com.

Onscreen text: Jakafi is a registered trademark of Incyte Corporation. © 2016, Incyte Corporation. All rights reserved. RUX-1866   04/16

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Important Safety Information

Indications and Usage

Jakafi is a prescription medicine used to treat people with polycythemia vera who have already taken a medicine called hydroxyurea and it did not work well enough or they could not tolerate it.

Jakafi is also used to treat certain types of myelofibrosis.

Important Safety Information

Jakafi can cause serious side effects, including:

Low blood counts: Jakafi® (ruxolitinib) may cause your platelet, red blood cell, or white blood cell counts to be lowered. If you develop bleeding, stop taking Jakafi and call your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider will perform blood tests to check your blood counts before you start Jakafi and regularly during your treatment. Your healthcare provider may change your dose of Jakafi or stop your treatment based on the results of your blood tests. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop or have worsening symptoms such as unusual bleeding, bruising, tiredness, shortness of breath, or a fever.

Infection: You may be at risk for developing a serious infection during treatment with Jakafi. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any of the following symptoms of infection: chills, nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness, fever, painful skin rash or blisters.

Skin cancers: Some people who take Jakafi have developed certain types of non-melanoma skin cancers. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop any new or changing skin lesions.

Increases in cholesterol: You may have changes in your blood cholesterol levels. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to check your cholesterol levels during your treatment with Jakafi.

The most common side effects of Jakafi include: low platelet count, low red blood cell counts, bruising, dizziness, headache.

These are not all the possible side effects of Jakafi. Ask your pharmacist or healthcare provider for more information. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Before taking Jakafi, tell your healthcare provider about: all the medications, vitamins, and herbal supplements you are taking and all your medical conditions, including if you have an infection, have or had tuberculosis (TB) or have been in close contact with someone who has TB, have or had hepatitis B, have or had liver or kidney problems, are on dialysis, had skin cancer, or have any other medical condition. Take Jakafi exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. Do not change your dose or stop taking Jakafi without first talking to your healthcare provider. Do not drink grapefruit juice while on Jakafi.

Women should not take Jakafi while pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if breast-feeding.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information, which includes a more complete discussion of the risks associated with Jakafi.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

You may also report side effects to Incyte Medical Information at 1-855-463-3463.